The Culture of Catcalling

Note: Due to my schedule, some of my posts are written in an area where I can’t post links to social media or certain sites. For that reason, I will sometimes substitute with newspaper articles or attempt to upload links later in the day.

Some of you may remember this video from 2014 where an edited compilation of footage shows a woman being catcalled or receiving street harassment over the course of 10 hours as she walks through Manhattan. I initially wanted to do an article on this video when I first heard about last year but the YouTube comments made it clear that I would be fighting an uphill battle with the other men on the internet.

There were plenty of defences given for the catcalling and I want to address some of them.

  1. How is saying “good morning” or “how are you?” catcalling?

The issue is not the greeting itself in this case. Maybe people will call me a “white knight” for saying this, but this is a situation where you have to view it from the eys of a woman. Most men can’t relate to being catcalled by women daily. There was a response video where a male model walked around a city in his underwear, trying to argue men have it just as bad. However, the guy was definitely better looking than the average guy. Plus, the response video seemed to imply that a man walking around in his underwear is equivalent to a woman walking around in jeans and a shirt.

You can try to offer one ludicrious parallel after another, but I think most men will agree that we are not catcalled multiple times a day by strangers as we walk down the street.

So, with that in mind. Imagine you’re a woman. From the time you reach a certain age, you start getting all this attention from strangers on the street. It’s strange at first, but maybe you find it flattering after a little while. Then after a few years, the same thing happens day in day out. Some people are just saying “good morning” to be polite, the same way you’d say “good morning” to a colleague at work. However, some people use that opening as an attempt to get your number, tell you how hot you are etc. So after a while, you’re a little more guarded or skeptical when someone offers the greeting. Are they just being friendly or is it a preamble for something else? This is a case where a few (or maybe a lot), may have ruined a good thing for many.

2. Shouldn’t girls should be flattered?

Read number one again. The woman who are very flattered by catcalling are likely the ones who aren’t subjected to it that often. I was listening to a “Mating Grounds” podcast by Tucker Max, where he asked a female colleague why women wouldn’t be flattered by catcalling or why comments such as “good morning” would bother them. As the woman points out, it is the accumulation of those experiences that makes you grow tired of it after a while. Maybe it is flattering the first day, first week, first year, first decade etc. If a woman who is regularly catcalled still loves the attention, then she is likely very insecure.

As Tucker Max added, he was used to fans at his book signings asking him if he was drunk. It was funny the first few times but by the time the 50th fan asked him he wanted to punch them in the face.

3. So what, we’re not allowed to talk to girls anymore?

If the only girls you talk to are random ones on the street, you need to get out more. Join groups for activities you’re interested, get to know your classmates in college etc, hang out with these new things called friends and see if they know girls. There are other places to talk to women where they won’t be as guarded due to their previous experiences.

The guys who insist that catcalling is a vital part of being a man always crack me up, since they are also the ones who complain the most about women being “stuck-up” or narcissistic. What do you expect will happen if a woman is reminded multiple times a day of how hot she is by guys on the street, plus guys who comment on all her social media and message her with comments dripping with sexual desperation? Trust me, if men collectively put a stop to these actions, we would collectively have an easier time with women.

With those excuses out of the way, I also want to comment on something else that this catcalling video brings up. Now, I am not trying to say that criticism of catcalling is now invalidated due to this issue. I am only saying that it reveals another dimension of the video that gets overshadowed by the people who can’t even acknowledge that catcalling might not be a good thing.

“The Mating Grounds” podcast brought illustrated my problem as well. Tucker Max pointed out that a lot of the men in the video were black, and also attributed this to a general culture of catcalling among black men. I don’t want to call Tucker Max a racist since a lot of his other content demonstrates that he acknowledges discrimination such as racial profiling by police. However, I think this comment illustrates some level of ignorance, which this article actually helps to shed light on. Although the company behind the street harassment video claimed that they filmed through many different areas of Manhattan, an analysis of the all the locations in the edited two minute clip reveals that 59% of the shots were in Harlem. For those who don’t know, Harlem is over 60% black. Since the areas we see in the video are mostly black, it makes sense that we will see mostly black people in the video.

There is a chance that black people might not just be more likely to catcall. We won’t know since the video’s creator apparently cut out more footage of white guys since the clips contained too much noise. The reponsible thing to do in that case would be to try and collect more footage without too much noise, in order to get a more representative sample. There are other catcalling videos out there, and they all show a healthy dose of white men engaging in it as well. Let’s not reduce catcalling to something that only (or mostly) black guys do.

 

Y: The Last Man and Amazons

Hi everyone,

I know I missed a post yesterday but this post I did for comicommand went up on that site yesterday. If you like writing about comics feel free to check out comicommand and join us to contribute your own articles.

I’ll be posting a new piece tonight. The article is below:

The Walking Dead is currently my favourite comic book series and while I endure the one-month gap between issues, I decided to check out Y: The Last Man. It was highly recommended by many lists and was also only sixty issues long, saving me from the worry of a very long commitment on top of numerous other series and books I wish to read.

I binge-read the series over this past weekend and was not disappointed. Y: The Last Man is a science-fiction comic, where 25-year-old Yorick Brown and his pet monkey are seemingly the only ones to survive the spontaneous death of all male mammals. The sixty issues encompass Yorick’s fight for survival in a post-apocalyptic world and his efforts to uncover the source of the catastrophe.

However, the series also gives us The Daughters of the Amazon, a society that burns down sperm clinics and is determined to remove all traces of perceived patriarchy. They attack Yorick on sight for being male and spend a large portion of the series trying to track him down in order to ensure that he does not reinstall the patriarchy they are fighting against. For the Amazons, the catastrophe that killed most of the men was an act of God or a sign that women need to reclaim their rightful place.

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The Amazons can either come across as an indictment of feminism, or more likely they’re a caricature of it. Something here is meant to ridicule the heightened fears that many men have about feminism. The plot obviously lends itself to feminism, since it deals with a society that is mostly female having to rebuild and eventually being able to do so. The first few issues also focus on the issue of presidential succession, highlighting how the predominance of male figures leads the Minister of Agriculture to become the next President of the United States. Agent 355, a member of a covert government branch known as the Culper Ring, also accompanies Yorick throughout the story and acts as his highly competent bodyguard and confidante. It would be contradictory for the series to present one strong female character after another, and then throw in The Amazons as a criticism of feminism.

The series began in 2002, well after The Men’s Right Movement led to a backlash against “political correctness” and “feminazis”. Like today, feminists were fighting for issues such as the eradication of rape culture, the culture of blaming rape victims for being raped e.g. “She asked for it.” Meanwhile, the manosphere begin to grow. The manosphere refers to a loosely connected group of blogs and websites that believe masculinity and men as a whole are now diminished due to feminism. The Men’s Rights Movement began by targeting divorce and child custody laws that favoured women, but has now expanded into a group of men who view relationships as adversarial in nature and believe that men need to dominate women. The manosphere has birthed groups such as pick-up artists and many members have a heightened level of bitterness and anger towards woman, especially concerning sexual rejection. The manosphere promotes the belief that feminism has disrupted men’s natural dominance in the world, leading women to become overly confident. This then makes men victims to egotistical and shallow women who are protected from criticism by the new social order which seeks to destroy masculinity.

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With this background information, it becomes easier to see how some men may view the Amazons as regular feminists, as opposed to stereotypical ones. Throughout the series, other female characters counteract the depiction of the Amazons. The comic does not present the women as perfect characters or ones who are all superior to Yorick. Some characters use him for sex, he outsmarts others and many of the women serve as Yorick’s villains. They are strong fighters, soldiers, intelligent scientists and people who are as lost in the new world as Yorick is.

The comics even imply that many of the Amazons only joined the group to escape hunger and homelessness. These are the motives that lead Yorick’s sister, Hero, to join the Amazons early in the story. While it is implied that the leader truly believes in her vision, it is clear that ideology is secondary to security for some Amazons. With this, the Amazons possibly get whittled down to a few members with extreme ideologies. Members like this are found in every group, and the Amazons become a more realistic and moderate creation if we realize that only a few members of their population truly believe that all men must die. Just like the manosphere like to argue that “not all men are like that”, Y: The Last Man argues, “not all women are like that”.

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Hollywood Brainwashing: Political Correctness and Agendas

Mad Max: Fury Road is one of the most creative, entertaining and memorable films I have seen in the past few years, if not ever. The acting, writing and of course, the action and visuals were all amazing. The title character, Max Rockatansky (Tom Hardy), has few lines and in many ways isn’t even the main character. I didn’t find this jarring or bothersome since this was similar to Mad Max 2, where the plot revolved around one of the communities Max came across in the apocalyptic landscape. Like Fury Road, Mad Max 2 also focused more on the community and the villain.

However, this fact appears to have been lost on some people. Fury Road has received widespread acclaim and was even nominated for best picture at the golden globes and the Oscars: a huge achievement for an action film that is basically a two hour car chase (albeit a beautifully crafted one). Then again, the loudest voices can often stand out best, even if they are the fewest.

When discussing the film online it seems that praise for Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron) is closely followed by criticism of “feminist propaganda” or a “feminist agenda”. Searching “Mad Max Fury Road Feminism” brings up numerous articles from outlets such as The Guardian and The New York Post. The presence of strong female characters is hard to ignore, but I think it is a problem when we view strong female characters as indicative of an agenda.

Any discussion of ideological messages in films is often derailed by those who proclaim “It’s just a movie”. Yet as I’ve indicated many times before in blog posts and YouTube videos, this logic does not apply when the ruling class in Hollywood (white men) is affected. We are so used to seeing strong male characters, that seeing a strong female one comes across as “forced”, or “politically correct”.

I was interested in seeing Batman: Bad Blood, one of DC’s animated films. Before I looked into it I thought I would go to IMDB and see what other users thought of the film. One conversation in particular caught my interest:

screenshot

 

Unfortunately the text came out blurred but I figured it would be good to have proof of this conversation. I know people always like to say that people who express discriminatory ideas online are just trolls, but I think that simplifies things far too much. There are definitely people who get amusement from inflammatory comments, but I don’t think that explains every single discriminatory comment online. The internet is an arena where people can express their true feelings anonymously or with a pseudonym.

The person who started this post seems genuinely upset at being called a troll, his words are his “honest thoughts and opinions.” Perhaps the honest opinion he would not reveal in class or at work?

Bad Blood focuses on batman’s sidekicks and their efforts to fight crime in Gotham after his disappearance. While Nightwing and Robin are in the story, Batwoman is too. According to the person who started this conversation, the film would have been better without Batwoman since her sections felt “forced” and her homosexuality felt “heavy handed” (the newest Batwoman is Lesbian) . As another poster points out, this heavy handed homosexuality plays out with one scene of Batwoman flirting with a woman at a bar.

Some people reading this may agree with the original poster, but that brings up the issue I am trying to tackle. If one scene of a woman flirting with another is a heavy-handed depiction of homosexuality, would the scenes of Nightwing flirting with another woman also be heavy-handed heterosexuality? For decades, Hollywood has fed the world a steady diet of entertainment. Most of these characters fit a certain mold: white, male and straight. Years of seeing most heroes fit this mold can then lead to this becoming normalized (Dyer, White, 1997). When whiteness and masculinity becomes normalized in film, it is then easier for women and people of colour to be viewed as subversive. People who are outright bigots can also disguise their prejudice and aversion to seeing minorities and homosexuality on screen by saying that they simply don’t like it if it’s “heavy handed”. As the example above demonstrates, it does not take much for these elements to be viewed as heavy-handed.

A recent example of this which I have discussed before is the reaction to Rey in Star Wars: Episode VII. Rey has been relentlessly criticized for being a Mary Stu, a female character who is often overly skilled and is often viewed as the worst example of “feminist influence”. While it is reasonable to look at Rey’s progression in the film as being highly unrealistic, I just wonder if fans nitpick her progression as much as they nitpick Luke’s in Star Wars: Episode V or any male character’s in pretty much any movie. Can we all say that we have never seen a film where a male character ends up being a prodigy at whatever is important to the plot? Can we honestly say that we tore that characterization apart because it seemed too unrealistic, or did we embrace it and rejoice in how badass the character is?

With all of the bitterness and anger directed towards women on screen it seems that any female character who is on screen to do more than hook up with someone or be a damsel in distress is now viewed as unnatural and unwelcome. The same logic applies to minorities of any kind. If a black character is portrayed as heroic, intelligent and articulate, the movie is too politically correct. If a religious minority is represented as a fleshed out, sympathetic character then it is “propaganda”. Even better, the film is “pushing an agenda”. God forbid, if the film actually discusses discrimination of any kind openly, whether it is racism, sexism or homophobia . As another poster on IMDB said, he hopes The Revenant can win best picture since it is the movie that is a “non-agenda” movie.

Note: This post barely scratches the surfaces of all the things I want to say on this topic, so I will probably revisit the topic and get in the habit of blogging about other examples of this trend.

Works Cited

Dyer, R. (1997). White. London, UK: Routledge.

 

Rejection and the Manosphere

Rejection, like death and taxes, is a part of life,

It starts off simple,

Something our parents don’t want to get us,

An idea they do not want to support,

 

Then it evolves into rejection from our peers,

We don’t fit in certain groups,

We’re too shy, too skinny, too nerdy,

We don’t only hear this from our friends,

But from the people we like to think of as more than friends,

 

Everyone has dealt with this rejection,

And many of us continue to deal with it,

The thing that separates us is how we deal with it and what we learn from it,

 

There are those who continuously learn, improve on their approach and themselves,

They do not live with the goal of acceptance from someone else in mind,

They work hard to improve themselves to make themselves happier, knowing that success can flow from this,

 

Others let bitterness and anger overwhelm them,

They’ve been hurt by women, and they figure the solution is to direct their anger and hatred towards all women,

It is a fact that some women are manipulative and deceitful,

But it is also a fact that many do not intend to be hurtful when they reject someone,

 

The manosphere does not understand this,

Grown men are reduced to online whiners who are more interested in feminism than feminists are,

They see it as the source of all their problems, of all the worlds problems,

If the cruel “feminazis” didn’t exist, then they could be real men and get more of what they wanted,

 

I’ve read their work and it sickens me,

Sickens me that men aspire to be like the pitiful, insecure people who spend too much time thinking about what women supposedly owe them,

Sickens me that real, confident men are treated like cowards, “manginas” or “white knights” whenever they express some common sense

 

Yet I believe this is the direction the world is heading in,

Minorities are hated on when they complain about racism,

White people think they get discriminated against more,
And now men are combatting feminism, angry that women supposedly have it too easy nowadays,

We are living in the age of the disgruntled majorities, where the powerful play victim and attack those who already have less than them,

“Madness is rare in individuals-but in groups, parties, nations and ages it is the rule.”-Friedrich Nietzsche