Bates Motel Finale

Spoilers for Bates Motel

I started the fifth and final season of Bates Motel soon after its premiere in February but just finished the last episode this weekend. The delay was not due to a lack of interest in the series itself, but more of a lack of interest in Kodi. I used the streaming service for any show that either wasn’t available on Netflix or didn’t have its latest season there. After dealing with the crash of one Kodi add-on after another, I grew sick of Kodi and then retreated exclusively to Netflix offerings for a long time.

Since I finished watching the first season of Hemlock Grove and Big Mouth, I finally made time to wrap up one of my favourite shows. This piece isn’t necessarily a review, it’s just an offering of some of the things on my mind after finally finishing.

Bates Motel was marketed as a “contemporary prequel” to 1960’s Psycho, and like some intended prequels I didn’t expect the events to line up exactly. The original film doesn’t give us too much about Norman Bates’s background, except the fact that he killed his mom and her lover out of jealousy. Seasons 1-3 were untouched territory in terms of Norman Bates’s development, and his relationship with his mother and other women.

While I detested some of the subplots in these seasons, mainly due to the terrible acting on display from the high school girls, especially Nicola Peltz as Bradley Martin. This woman has the ability to ruin anything she touches, whether it’s bringing down Bates Motel or adding to the misery of The Last Airbender.

Pictured above: One great actor, along with a black hole of charisma and screen presence.

I digressed.

While Peltz’s acting was awful, Norman’s relationship with her actually explained why he would grow even closer to his mother. After pursuing a girl he liked, he was rejected and used. Then Norma was quick to take advantage of that and reinforce all of the negative ideas swirling in Norman’s head about other women. While Norman had a good relationship with Emma Decody, she became his “good girl” in a sense: The sweeter girl who he ignored. By the time Norman moved on from Bradley, Emma was moving on from him.

Seasons 3, 4 and 5 got us closer to the formation of the Norman Bates we see in Psycho. While it was always implied that Norman’s blackouts were another personality taking over, season 4 gave us our first real glimpse of Mother taking over Norman. When Bradley dies, Norma isn’t represented as a figure alongside him. She literally embodies him. This is similar to a moment where Norman confronts his uncle, Caleb, in season 2, but Bradley’s death actually shows us Vera on camera in Freddie’s place.

Followed by Bradley’s death:

With Bradley’s death at the end of season 3, one of the worst actors in the show is removed and more importantly, we get closer to Psycho. Norma and Romero get married in season 4, starting off for financial purposes and then developing into real love. At this point, I wondered if Romero would be the lover that drives Norman to commit a double homicide.

Later in the season we find out that Norman doesn’t kill Romero and Norma at the same time, but mother dearest does meet death at her son’s hands. This was a change from the movie mythos but one change I did not expect was Norman’s death at the hands of his brother.

From the beginning I assumed that any character not referenced in Pyscho would be dead by the time the show ended. I imagined that Norman would remain the only main cast member alive, managing the motel by himself as the show ended. This theory got thrown out when a character from the original film, Marion Crane was introduced. Crane, the infamous 1960 shower victim, was the series’s biggest callback to the film. While Crane didn’t serve as the victim in the show, she still played a part in events that sent Norman into full on Psycho territory.

Crane is replaced by Sam Loomis, another person that I was very happy to be rid of.

As I mentioned in a previous post about Bates Motel,  I was happy the show didn’t use the iconic score from the film (good quality uploads are hard to find online). Episode 5.6 became one of my favourites simply for how it handled this scene and for all the possibilities it gave us in future episodes.

Like the movie, Norman has unearthed his mother’s body and brought it back home. He is starting to wear his mother’s clothes and wig when her personality takes over, and for a part of the season it looks like he might avoid punishment for any of his crimes. Norma’s downfall is all tied to a moment of self-awareness and empathy that allows him to confess to his crimes, forcing the police to look into the whereabouts of his victims. By the time Norma takes the reins again it is too late.

Romero dies, mainly because his grief causes him to turn his back on Norman. One of the toughest characters on the show ends up bludgeoned and shot by a kid who’s neck he should have snapped when he had the chance. It is actually my favourite character, Dylan, who ends up being the hero and delivers the biggest shock of the show.

Bates Motel branches off, carving its own path and killing off Norman Bates. Norman gets to be reunited with his mother, while Dylan is reunited with his family. While it was still sad to see Norman die, it was the only way to end his pain and to stop him from harming anyone else. If he was constrained to a mental institution away from his mother for the rest of his life, he would have been miserable. If he remained free, with periodic killings of any woman that “Mother” viewed as a threat, then other people would end up suffering.

The relationship between Dylan and Emma was strained following the confirmation that Norman killed Emma’s mom, but I was happy to see that they remained a couple. Perhaps it would be more realistic that Norman’s actions drove a wedge between them. Then again, it is not like Emma met Norman due to Dylan. It was the other way around. Dylan can’t be blamed for bringing Norman into their lives and he can’t be blamed for what Norman did. Norma is more to blame for refusing to get help for her son, but Emma’s visit to Norma’s grave shows that she still loves and respects Mother.

It’s been a long time coming but I am happy to wrap up one of the few shows that actually continued to get better with each season.